New Year’s Resolution | Cooking

It’s no secret around my house and throughout my family that, despite my affinity for food, I’m a terrible cook. In 23 years I’ve managed to amass the skills to make myself an omelette in the morning, prep some overnight oats and that’s about it.

So, for my New Years resolution, I’ve decided to develop that practical skill that is sorely lacking in my life. I’m much too dependant on my boyfriend who does all of our home-made cooking but not anymore! I’ve gathered a wish list of cookbooks that I hope will boost be along my journey to culinary independence.

Community: Salad Recipies from Arthur Street Kitchen by Hetty McKinnon

My new repertoire of delicious food will obviously have to include a fair spread of hearty salads. Community collects recipes from McKinnon’s cult  Arthur Street Cafe that, from my quick flick through, from my quick flick through seem relatively simple and do-able. I mean, how hard can a salad be right? This is no 63-degree egg.

The Broadsheet Sydney Cookbook by Broadsheet

I will never be able to make anything from this book. I knew this. You know this. And Broadsheet probably know this. However, as a collection of recipes for some of the best dishes in Sydney’s eclectic and upmarket dining scene it will, at the very least, serve as some intense and aesthetically-pleasing inspiration.

Alimentari by Linda Malcolm

Alimentari compiles “attainable” Italian-Middle Eastern inspired dishes from the menus ofMalcolm’s two Melbourne cafes by the same name. We’re talking salads, soups and sandwiches. Some must-have stuff.

Plenty More by Yotam Ottolenghi

Vegetarian dishes! What cooking skill set is complete without an offering of vegetarian dishes? For no explicable reason, and without ever being or considering being vegetarian, Plenty More has been on my wishlist for a long time as a must-have introduction to hearty, filling and delicious vegetarian meals.

Nopi: The Cookbook by Ramael Scully and Yotam Ottolenghi

Again, I will never develop the skills to actually produce anything from this book but it’s inspiring and nice to look at. Written in collaboration with Nopi head chef Ramael Scully, this intimidating guide to the recipes of the Soho restaurant, covers everything from starters and sides, fish, meat and vegetable mains, puddings, brunch, condiments and even cocktails.

Secret Recipes by Dominique Ansel

Like vegetarian meals, pastries are a must in covering all of my fictive culinary bases and what better way to learn than from Ansel, the Paris-rained pastry chef credited with the creation of the cult/fad dessert-hybrid, the Cronut. I’m being unrealistically ambitious. I know I’m being unrealistically ambitious.

Tokyo Cult Recipies by Maori Murota

My boyfriend and I are both nuts for Japanese food and this pocket encyclopaedia contains recipes for everything from miso, sushi, soba noodles, bentos, sushi, fried rice, Japanese tapas, desserts, cakes and sweets, plus  the key basic cooking techniques and step-by-step guides for making rice, dashi, miso and sushi.

Image via The Food Dept. 

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